A Bit of Astoria’s Past to Be Preserved: Owner of Deals Store Agrees to Preserve Historic Terra Cotta Decorations

Thank you to Morris Dweck, owner of the Deals store in Astoria, Queens.  After many residents (including me) protested the potential destruction of the beautiful and historic terra cotta decorations on his storefront, he is taking steps to preserve them.  I’m very happy about this, as I’ve seen and loved these whimsical decorations all my life and believe they add some much-needed character to the neighborhood.  Here’s an excerpt from his letter, and some drawings of how the building will look.

At long last, attached, please find the rendering for project at 3601 Broadway in Astoria.  These renderings may be published and redistributed as you wish.

As you will see, all the architectural detail is being preserved.  Additionally, I am proud to announce that we will be installing same limestone above the current DII Store at 3611 Broadway so that the façade appears unified.

Our contractors have been given these drawings, and every effort will be made to fulfill this depiction as shown.

I would like to thank our architect Mr Walter Marin and his team for working hard and fast to prepare these drawings. I would also like to acknowledge the building owner for her cooperation and her guidance in satisfying the requests of the neighborhood.

As stated previously, we at DII Stores are committed to the local Community and residents of Astoria and aspire to meet their wishes to preserve its history and culture. We are confident that our investment of time and money will be rewarded with increased patronage and continued loyalty. DII has been part of the Astoria Community for over 35 years, and we look forward to serving Astoria for generations to come.

— Morris Dweck

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Save Astoria’s Cultural Heritage

Rite Aid

I’m very upset that a lovely and historic piece of architecture in my hometown of Astoria, NY, is under threat of destruction.  This terra cotta decoration on 36th St. and Broadway features Neptune and other symbols of the sea, as many decades ago it used to be a Childs Restaurant.

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Later it became a Rite Aid, and now it’s a Deals store.  According to the Greater Astoria Historical Society, they’re planning on destroying this whimsical work.  Astoria has been undergoing massive gentrification lately, but that’s no reason to destroy one of the few architectural gems we have.  Please see the Historical Society’s Facebook page for more information.  Apparently they’re trying to give it landmark status, but it’s a difficult process.  They recommend contacting Council Member Costa Constantinides‘ office.  Please help get the word out to protect Astoria’s (and NYC’s) historic and unique architecture!

Addendum

Please consider sending the following message to Councilman Costa Constantinides at costa@council.nyc.gov.  We need all the help we can get!

Dear Mr. Constantinides:

It has come to my attention that the beautiful and historic terra cotta decoration on the former Rite Aid on 36th Street and Broadway is in danger of being destroyed. This architectural detail is part of Astoria’s cultural heritage and has delighted generations of Astorians, myself included. Built as a Childs Restaurant in the 1920s, this building deserves landmark status. Astoria has undergone massive gentrification in recent years, but that is no reason to destroy one of the few architectural gems we have in this neighborhood.

Thank you,

[Your Name]

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Filed under art, NYC

Things to Buy in the Yucatan

I don’t usually buy much on my trips, because the stuff I really want — hand-made crafty items — are usually too expensive.  But that wasn’t the case in my recent trip to the Yucatan.  While good quality, hand-made items aren’t exactly cheap, they were well within my price range.  Plus you can bargain for a lot of things.  I’m not a good haggler, but I still don’t feel like I overpaid.  I came away with a real swag bag of stuff.  Such as…

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  1. A hand-embroidered bag made in Chiapas for about $30.  I loved the colors and pattern.  I got it in a craft store in Valladolid, where you can’t really haggle.
  2. A cedar mask from a vendor in the archaeological site of Chichen Itza, for about $30, but I may have overpaid.  These vendors are everywhere in Chichen Itza.  You can often see them working right next to their tables.  It’s kind of annoying to have the vendors calling out to you while you’re looking at some of the most famous examples of Mayan architecture, but there’s no getting around it.
  3. IMG_2829 A jaguar whistle, also from Chichen Itza.  I got it for about $5, but I may have underpaid.  When you blow into it and move your hand over the hole on the bottom, it makes a sound like a jaguar roaring.  But I can’t do it nearly as well as the vendors did.  You hear them making this sound constantly in Chichen Itza.
  4. Maya chocolate.  Cost about 100 pesos from a store in Valladolid.  The Maya basically invented chocolate, so I wanted to try this more “authentic” version.  It’s pretty good — a little chalkier than I’m used to, but good.  Comes in many different flavors.
  5. IMG_2830 Shells.  Okay, so I didn’t buy these, but I thought I may as well include them.  I found them on a deserted beach in Cozumel, which is a shell-collector’s paradise.  I brought home a small conch, a light pink cowrie shell, and some other beauties.

Have you ever bought anything in the Yucatan?

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Filed under Mexico, travel, Yucatan

The Intangible Pre-Travel Checklist

There are plenty of lists out there on how to pack for a trip – what to take in terms of clothes, jewelry, shoes, toiletries, etc.  But what about the countless intangible things you have to take care of before you can put your feet up and relax?  Those nagging, pesky little issues that you think you’ve squared away until your plane takes off and you say to yourself, “Wait – do I have enough money in my checking account?”  Well, I’ve made a list of all the little things I have to do before jetting off to my next destination.   It may come in handy for you too!

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If you want to relax, take care of these things first!

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Why Are Swedish Museums So Morbid?

I was in Stockholm recently, and one thing that struck me is how morbid the museums are.  They love showing skulls, skeletons, faces reconstructed from skulls, ghostly visuals, etc.  Don’t get me wrong – I think this is great.  It really makes history come alive (ironically) and forces you to think about the lives of those who came before.  It was just a little unnerving to see so many bones; I’ve never seen such an obsession with death in any other country’s museums.  But what else would you expect from the nation of Ingmar Bergman?

Here’s a gallery of some of the scariest exhibits in Sweden.  The exhibit on the 1361 Battle of Gotland in the Historiska museum was particularly graphic.  Happy early Halloween!

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Filed under death, Gotland, Halloween, medieval, morbid, museums, scary, skeletons, skulls, Stockholm, Sweden, Vasa, Vikings

General Slocum Sign in Astoria Park

Hello all!  Just a quick post about my hometown of Astoria, New York.  If you live here, you may know that the General Slocum disaster took place in 1904 a short distance from Astoria Park.  To quote Wikipedia:

An estimated 1,021 of the 1,342 people on board died. The General Slocum disaster was the New York area’s worst disaster in terms of loss of life until the September 11, 2001 attacks.

For as long as I can remember, there’s been a sign in Astoria Park commemorating this tragic event.  Most of those who died were women and children.  Well, recently I noticed the sign was missing.  It may have been vandalized.  This is a horrible thing.  Can you imagine someone vandalizing a sign commemorating the September 11th attacks?

The view from Astoria Park

The view from Astoria Park

A few weeks ago, I contacted the NYC Parks department about the missing sign.  They said they “have already placed an order for a replacement sign, with an expectation that a replacement should be reinstalled within about four weeks time.”  The sign should be back up soon.  Keep your eye out for it, and never forget the General Slocum!

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Filed under America, history, NYC

What’s the Deal with Asian Showers?

I’ve read lots of horror stories about Asian toilets (i.e., the notorious squat toilet), but none about Asian showers.  By this I mean a shower that has no tub, curtain, or any other kind of separation from the rest of the bathroom.  You turn on the water and, voila, the whole bathroom gets wet!  I’ve experienced this personally in Taiwan, Thailand, and Turkey.

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An open shower/ bathroom in Cappadocia, Turkey

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Another open shower/ bathroom in Taiwan

I know I’m showing my ignorance as a Westerner, but I just don’t get this kind of shower.  It seems very impractical.  You can’t leave much in the bathroom (clothes, towels, etc.) because it will constantly get wet.  Unless the shower drain works perfectly, you will have a small flood in your bathroom every time you shower.  When the water finally does drain out, it leaves a ring of hair, lint, and other nasty stuff on the floor.  It promotes the growth of mold and mildew.  Plus whenever you go into the bathroom to use the toilet, you’ll step in a wet, icky mess.

I guess it’s cheaper to build bathrooms this way, but I don’t think it would take much to add a curtain and some kind of recess in the floor for the shower area.  I saw a bathroom like this in Thailand, and it worked pretty well.

What do you think about the Asian shower?  Is there a trick to using it?  Are there advantages to it I’m not seeing?  Or does it bother the heck out of you?

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Filed under Asia, humor, Thailand, travel, Turkey