Tag Archives: Goreme

The Top 6 Things About Living in a Cave

I spent a lot of time exploring caves during my trip to Cappadocia, a fascinating region in central Turkey. People have been living in caves there for thousands of years. They carved everything out of the rock: monasteries, underground cities, stables, workshops, and of course, homes. I wanted to get the full cave experience, so I stayed in a cave hotel in Göreme for three nights. Based on my experience, here are the top 6 reasons for living a troglodyte existence.

IMG_5597

Our cave hotel room in Cappadocia, Turkey.


1.  You can tell people you lived in a cave!  This is an automatic conversation starter, and people seem to find it very impressive — probably because they picture you living underground, without electricity, and surrounded by bats. As you can see from the picture above, it’s not like that at all.

2.  You have no idea how old your room is.  A cave carved out yesterday looks pretty much the same as a cave carved several centuries ago.  Let your imagination run wild as you think about the room’s past inhabitants and uses.

IMG_6229

A cave room in an ancient monastery complex.

3. With the right tools, you can instantly create extra shelf space, windows, doors, etc. (Warning: Don’t do this unless you actually own the cave.)

4. A cave stays cool in the summer, warm in the winter (relatively). We were still freezing in our cave in November.

5. Get in touch with your caveman roots. You’ll feel like you’ve stepped into the set of The Flintstones.

IMG_5848

A man stepping into his cave house.

6. Feel like you’re roughing it without the roughness. A lot of cave hotels are actually quite luxurious, with all the amenities you would expect of a modern hotel.

Have you ever stayed in a cave? What did you think?

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under ancient, Europe, history, humor, photography, travel, Turkey

Turkish Food: What a Delight!

One of the things that surprised me most about Turkey was how good the food is. I had expected it to be like Middle Eastern food, with maybe a hint of Greek, but I was blown away by the endless variety that presented itself. Outside of Turkey, Turkish food is represented by the ubiquitous doner kebab. Well, I didn’t have doner kebab once while I was in Turkey – there was simply too much else to try. Due to the widespread reach of the Ottoman Empire, Turkish food combines the best of Balkan, Middle Eastern, and Persian cuisine, and much more. They take great pride in the freshness of their ingredients, and menus are small but robust. As an added bonus – at least for the American or European tourist – Turkish food is cheap. The food costs about half as much as what I would expect to pay in the States.

With that said, here’s a gallery of my gastronomic tour through Turkey (I went to Istanbul and Cappadocia). Bon Appétit!

Leave a comment

Filed under food, Istanbul, travel, Turkey